Like reading Thackeray edited by Elmore Leonard

No Graves As Yet

No Graves As Yet
No Graves As Yet

On a sunny afternoon in late June, 1914, Cambridge don, Joseph Reavley is summoned from a student cricket match to learn that his parents have died in a road accident. Joseph’s brother, Matthew, as an officer in the Intelligence Service, reveals that their father had been en route to London to turn over to him a secret document – allegedly with the power to England and damage the British Empire. At the same time, events in Sarajevo will propel Europe, and the whole world, into war. But there are some tragic deaths on the home front and where is this mysterious document...if it exists at all?

  • "This absorbing mystery/spy thriller, set in tranquil Cambridge just before the onset of the Great War, marks a powerful start to bestseller Perry’s much anticipated new series. In a lush and deceptively peaceful opening scene, college professor and chaplain Joseph Reavley is interrupted while watching a cricket game by his intelligence officer brother, Matthew, who reports the sudden death of their parents in a car crash. This horrifying news sets off a long but compelling investigation by the brothers that takes them across verdant summertime England, looking for a secret document that their father was trying to deliver to Matthew at the time of his death. Against a backdrop of ominous news from the continent, Perry artfully weaves connections between pacifist students at Cambridge, one of whom is also murdered, and German agents who may be planning “a conspiracy to ruin England and everything we stand for”. The intrigue is further complicated by jilted lovers and jealous spouses at the university, all with grudges against an alleged blackmailer in their midst who may also be privy to exam cribbing and other illicit goings-on. Perry’s title, a quotation from G K Chesterton, is a portent of the carnage that soon awaits the youth of England, yet by the final resolution of this gripping case, many graves have regrettably already been filled in Cambridge’s serene churchyards." Publishers Weekly (Starred review),
  • "This dazzling story is one of sheer brilliance." Chronicle,
  • "Perry’s melancholy evocation of the ‘eternal afternoon’ that would soon turn to night all over England is lovely." New York Times,