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Revenge in a Cold River

Revenge in a Cold River
Revenge in a Cold River

London, 1869: The body of a middle-aged man is found tangled in a mass of rope and wooden wreckage near the dockside of the River Thames.  Commander William Monk of the River Police is called when initial investigations reveal the man was shot in the back.  When he learns that the man was a master forger who had just escaped prison, Monk's interest is immediately piqued.  But as his investigations lead him ever deeper into the murky world of smuggling and forgery, Monk is forced to confront his own forgotten past.  The unsolicited interference of an old foe takes precedence as it becomes clear to Monk that a bitter enemy is back for revenge and has him in his sights.  With his life and career in imminent danger, can Monk navigate his way to the truth before it is too late?  Commander Williams Monk - A man with no past has only his conscience and instinct to guide him.

  • "Anne Perry's fans have been following the adventures of her Victorian police detective, Thomas Pitt, and his socially connected wife, Charlotte, right up to the dawn of the new century. But the year is only 1869 in Revenge In A Cold River. Perry's latest novel in a grittier series featuring Cmdr. William Monk of the Thames River Police, a troubled man with a past so murky he can't even remember it. Like the great Dickens novel "Our Mutual Friend," the Monk series has a deep, almost primal bond with London's great river, which disgorges all sorts of objects, including human bodies, with each tide. The fresh corpse lying at Monk's feet at the beginning of this uncommonly atmospheric mystery was a master forger, and behind the murder of his "pasty piece of work" lies a clue to the puzzle of Monk's troublesome memory gaps. The storytelling is dazzling, as it always is in a Perry novel; but because the amnesiac hero stands accused of a strong of murders, he may very well have committed, back in a time he can't recall, the resolution is less an intellectual exercise than a matter of life and death." Marilyn Stasio." New York Times, September 2016